WASHINGTON — The Trump administration will announce it is rescinding California’s authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from automobiles at an event at the EPA’s Washington headquarters on Wednesday afternoon, according to people familiar with the matter.

The EPA intends to announce it will revoke the so-called waiver underpinning California’s power to set vehicle greenhouse gas standards separately from the Trump administration’s broader rule to ease federal vehicle-efficiency standards, which is expected in the weeks ahead, the people said.

The people asked to not be identified discussing plans prior to announcement.

Among those invited to the agency’s headquarters are free-market groups that have championed the Trump administration’s rollback of automobile fuel economy and emissions standards adopted during the Obama administration. Plans for the announcement are still being developed and could change, one of the people said.

The procedural move would allow the California attacks to proceed while the Trump administration continues to finalize federal fuel economy and emissions regulations for new autos after the 2020 model year. The plan also leaves intact California’s power to regulate smog-forming pollutants from autos and other sources.

The measures need approval from the White House’s Office of Management and Budget for review before they can take effect.

DETROIT — As the UAW’s national strike against General Motors stretched into its second day and negotiators returned to the bargaining table, economists and Wall Street analysts on Tuesday warned that a lengthy work stoppage could hurt GM and the Michigan economy.

The sides met for about 11 hours Monday before pausing for the night, according to a person with knowledge of the talks. During breaks, union leaders including Vice President Terry Dittes and Region 1A Director Chuck Browning appeared on picket lines and on TV. Dittes told Bloomberg the sides remained far apart on a number of issues.

Browning, speaking to MSNBC from GM’s Renaissance Center headquarters, said the union has “huge issues” regarding use of temporary workers, in addition to demands on health care, profit-sharing and skilled trades jobs.

GM on Sunday said its latest offer to the UAW included more than $7 billion in investment, creation or retention of 5,400 jobs and solutions for two of its four “unallocated plants.” The union, however, was irked that the proposal came with less than two hours left before its deadline, cementing its decision to call the first national strike against an automaker since the financial crisis.

Fitch Ratings on Monday said a short-term strike is not a credit risk, but a prolonged stoppage “could result in liquidity erosion” to the tune of a few billion dollars of cash burn. Fitch noted, however, that GM might be able to make up some lost production in the back half of the year, which would offset some of the losses.

Patrick Anderson, CEO of Anderson Economic Group in East Lansing, Mich., said Monday that if the strike reaches 10 days, the southeast Michigan economy would plunge into a recession.

“We already know suppliers and contractors that are affected, anecdotally,” Anderson said. “Places like Delta Township [outside Lansing] that are reliant on the GM economy, there’s already an effect. If [the strike] gets to the end of the week, we’ll start to see furlough notices at major suppliers, and that’s when things get bad.”

Moody’s Investors Service, days after lowering rival Ford Motor Co.’s credit rating to junk, said in a note Monday that the critical issue is whether GM will “secure the operating flexibility necessary” to address challenges including higher hourly costs than foreign automakers, a potential severe downturn in U.S. auto sales and the need for automakers “to begin transitioning to the production of more electric vehicles that will likely require fewer workers to assemble.”

The striking workers will continue to receive their normal health care coverage through September, Dittes wrote in a Monday letter. Beginning in October, workers will transition to coverage provided by the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, or COBRA. It will be paid for through the union’s strike fund, significantly increasing the cost to the UAW to keep workers off the job.

“We understand strikes are difficult and disruptive to families,” GM spokesman Jim Cain wrote in an email. “While on strike, some benefits shift to being funded by the union’s strike fund, and in this case hourly employees are eligible for union-paid COBRA so their health care benefits can continue.”

Workers on the picket lines, who during a strike make $250 a week after the eighth day, have said their priorities in a new contract include protections for temporary workers and a quicker path to top wages for those still earning second-tier pay. The union and automakers in 2015 established an eight-year grow-in period for workers to earn top dollar, but workers want that time frame shortened.

Workers also want GM and the other automakers to make up for concessions the union agreed to during the financial crisis to help keep them afloat.

“They didn’t address all the concessions we’ve had in recent years, the things we’ve given up for this corporation for it to become profitable again,” David Bupte, a longtime electrician who works at the company’s Detroit-Hamtramck assembly plant, told Automotive News Monday. “These employees have kids that want to go to school, they’ve got mortgages and car payments. All we’re asking for is a guarantee that we have a job and an income.”

Crain’s Detroit Business and Reuters contributed to this report.

DETROIT — As the UAW’s national strike against General Motors stretched into its second day and negotiators returned to the bargaining table, economists and Wall Street analysts on Tuesday warned that a lengthy work stoppage could hurt GM and the Michigan economy.

The sides met for about 11 hours Monday before pausing for the night, according to a person with knowledge of the talks. During breaks, union leaders including Vice President Terry Dittes and Region 1A Director Chuck Browning appeared on picket lines and on TV. Dittes told Bloomberg the sides remained far apart on a number of issues.

Browning, speaking to MSNBC from GM’s Renaissance Center headquarters, said the union has “huge issues” regarding use of temporary workers, in addition to demands on health care, profit-sharing and skilled trades jobs.

GM on Sunday said its latest offer to the UAW included more than $7 billion in investment, creation or retention of 5,400 jobs and solutions for two of its four “unallocated plants.” The union, however, was irked that the proposal came with less than two hours left before its deadline, cementing its decision to call the first national strike against an automaker since the financial crisis.

Fitch Ratings on Monday said a short-term strike is not a credit risk, but a prolonged stoppage “could result in liquidity erosion” to the tune of a few billion dollars of cash burn. Fitch noted, however, that GM might be able to make up some lost production in the back half of the year, which would offset some of the losses.

Patrick Anderson, CEO of Anderson Economic Group in East Lansing, Mich., said Monday that if the strike reaches 10 days, the southeast Michigan economy would plunge into a recession.

“We already know suppliers and contractors that are affected, anecdotally,” Anderson said. “Places like Delta Township [outside Lansing] that are reliant on the GM economy, there’s already an effect. If [the strike] gets to the end of the week, we’ll start to see furlough notices at major suppliers, and that’s when things get bad.”

Moody’s Investors Service, days after lowering rival Ford Motor Co.’s credit rating to junk, said in a note Monday that the critical issue is whether GM will “secure the operating flexibility necessary” to address challenges including higher hourly costs than foreign automakers, a potential severe downturn in U.S. auto sales and the need for automakers “to begin transitioning to the production of more electric vehicles that will likely require fewer workers to assemble.”

The striking workers will continue to receive their normal health care coverage through September, Dittes wrote in a Monday letter. Beginning in October, workers will transition to coverage provided by the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, or COBRA. It will be paid for through the union’s strike fund, significantly increasing the cost to the UAW to keep workers off the job.

“We understand strikes are difficult and disruptive to families,” GM spokesman Jim Cain wrote in an email. “While on strike, some benefits shift to being funded by the union’s strike fund, and in this case hourly employees are eligible for union-paid COBRA so their health care benefits can continue.”

Workers on the picket lines, who during a strike make $250 a week after the eighth day, have said their priorities in a new contract include protections for temporary workers and a quicker path to top wages for those still earning second-tier pay. The union and automakers in 2015 established an eight-year grow-in period for workers to earn top dollar, but workers want that time frame shortened.

Workers also want GM and the other automakers to make up for concessions the union agreed to during the financial crisis to help keep them afloat.

“They didn’t address all the concessions we’ve had in recent years, the things we’ve given up for this corporation for it to become profitable again,” David Bupte, a longtime electrician who works at the company’s Detroit-Hamtramck assembly plant, told Automotive News Monday. “These employees have kids that want to go to school, they’ve got mortgages and car payments. All we’re asking for is a guarantee that we have a job and an income.”

Crain’s Detroit Business and Reuters contributed to this report.

DETROIT — Ford Motor Co. has outlined an overhaul of its Dearborn campus to create a product and development center by 2025 as it continues work on its mobility innovation center in Detroit’s Corktown neighborhood.

The result is expected to be a 2.2 million-square-foot area that replaces buildings on the 700-acre Research and Engineering Center area, according to a plan set for public release Tuesday. The automaker’s Product Development Center in the engineering area is expected to be torn down, starting in 2023.

The project modifies a master plan, unveiled in 2016, in part to account for Ford’s subsequent purchase and renovation of Michigan Central Station in Detroit’s Corktown neighborhood for a mobility hub.

“It’s a dramatic moment in the history of Ford Motor Co. because the last time there was a moment like this was 1953” when the Product Development Center was dedicated, CEO Jim Hackett said on a conference call with reporters.

Ford said in a press release that it “will help Ford speed product and technology innovation and attract world-class talent.”

Construction is expected to be completed in two phases, the first by the end of 2022 and housing about 2,000 Ford employees. The second phase is to be done by 2025 and the new buildings would ultimately house about 6,000 workers, primarily designers and other vehicle development employees.

The design is expected to include features such as shared pathways, coffee shops and other retail space, although the scale of those aspects has not yet been determined, said Christina Twelftree, a Ford spokeswoman.

Hackett and other Ford executives, including Ford Land Development CEO David Dubensky, declined to reveal the development cost for the new space. However, new construction generally costs about $250 to $300 per square foot, so at 2.2 million square feet, the new building could cost $550 million to $660 million.

That’s in line with earlier estimates that Ford planned to spend north of $1 billion between Corktown and Dearborn on new space for autonomous and electric vehicle development in Detroit and revamping its campus in the suburbs.

Five buildings on the Dearborn campus have been demolished. Ford employees in the new space will be surrounded by natural elements, Dubensky said.

“In virtually every workspace is a connection to nature. Three-quarters of the campus will be dedicated to nature. We are taking down the buildings that exist along Rotunda and replacing them with walking paths, trees, etc.”

Ford also said it will have more flexible workspace and include transportation such as e-bikes, scooters and shuttles and, eventually, autonomous vehicles and other forms of mobility. There will be what Ford calls a “shared transportation loop” that “limits personal vehicle access to the perimeter of the site.”

The project has been in the works for years. The new building is the result of a multiyear process that has involved a variety of other consultants, including Snohetta, Gensler and SmithGroupJJR architecture and planning firms. Twelftree said Ford is in the bidding process for other contractors.

“We’ve not lost time from 2016 in that master plan,” Dubensky told reporters on the conference call last week. “In that master plan, we put in roads and infrastructure and sewers and parking lots.”

The Research and Engineering Center area was developed as a five-building campus in the early 1950s. More buildings were added over the years to meet increasing demand, ultimately growing to 37.

The Corktown campus is slated to cost about $740 million between the redevelopment of Michigan Central Station, which is expected by 2022, and construction of new space. Between that and the $550 million to $660 million the new building may cost, the campuses would total at least $1.29 billion, potentially $1.4 billion.

The company paid $90 million last year for Michigan Central Station, which is seven miles east of Ford’s Dearborn campus. When its redevelopment is complete, Michigan Central Station is slated to be the focal point of the 1.2 million-square-foot campus. Ford revealed the plans in June 2018, and work on the depot began in December.

The company received $239 million in local, state and federal incentives for that campus, which is expected to bring 5,000 autonomous and electric vehicle technology workers to the area.

DETROIT — Ford Motor Co. has outlined an overhaul of its Dearborn campus to create a product and development center by 2025 as it continues work on its mobility innovation center in Detroit’s Corktown neighborhood.

The result is expected to be a 2.2 million-square-foot area that replaces buildings on the 700-acre Research and Engineering Center area, according to a plan set for public release Tuesday. The automaker’s Product Development Center in the engineering area is expected to be torn down, starting in 2023.

The project modifies a master plan, unveiled in 2016, in part to account for Ford’s subsequent purchase and renovation of Michigan Central Station in Detroit’s Corktown neighborhood for a mobility hub.

“It’s a dramatic moment in the history of Ford Motor Co. because the last time there was a moment like this was 1953” when the Product Development Center was dedicated, CEO Jim Hackett said on a conference call with reporters.

Ford said in a press release that it “will help Ford speed product and technology innovation and attract world-class talent.”

Construction is expected to be completed in two phases, the first by the end of 2022 and housing about 2,000 Ford employees. The second phase is to be done by 2025 and the new buildings would ultimately house about 6,000 workers, primarily designers and other vehicle development employees.

The design is expected to include features such as shared pathways, coffee shops and other retail space, although the scale of those aspects has not yet been determined, said Christina Twelftree, a Ford spokeswoman.

Hackett and other Ford executives, including Ford Land Development CEO David Dubensky, declined to reveal the development cost for the new space. However, new construction generally costs about $250 to $300 per square foot, so at 2.2 million square feet, the new building could cost $550 million to $660 million.

That’s in line with earlier estimates that Ford planned to spend north of $1 billion between Corktown and Dearborn on new space for autonomous and electric vehicle development in Detroit and revamping its campus in the suburbs.

Five buildings on the Dearborn campus have been demolished. Ford employees in the new space will be surrounded by natural elements, Dubensky said.

“In virtually every workspace is a connection to nature. Three-quarters of the campus will be dedicated to nature. We are taking down the buildings that exist along Rotunda and replacing them with walking paths, trees, etc.”

Ford also said it will have more flexible workspace and include transportation such as e-bikes, scooters and shuttles and, eventually, autonomous vehicles and other forms of mobility. There will be what Ford calls a “shared transportation loop” that “limits personal vehicle access to the perimeter of the site.”

The project has been in the works for years. The new building is the result of a multiyear process that has involved a variety of other consultants, including Snohetta, Gensler and SmithGroupJJR architecture and planning firms. Twelftree said Ford is in the bidding process for other contractors.

“We’ve not lost time from 2016 in that master plan,” Dubensky told reporters on the conference call last week. “In that master plan, we put in roads and infrastructure and sewers and parking lots.”

The Research and Engineering Center area was developed as a five-building campus in the early 1950s. More buildings were added over the years to meet increasing demand, ultimately growing to 37.

The Corktown campus is slated to cost about $740 million between the redevelopment of Michigan Central Station, which is expected by 2022, and construction of new space. Between that and the $550 million to $660 million the new building may cost, the campuses would total at least $1.29 billion, potentially $1.4 billion.

The company paid $90 million last year for Michigan Central Station, which is seven miles east of Ford’s Dearborn campus. When its redevelopment is complete, Michigan Central Station is slated to be the focal point of the 1.2 million-square-foot campus. Ford revealed the plans in June 2018, and work on the depot began in December.

The company received $239 million in local, state and federal incentives for that campus, which is expected to bring 5,000 autonomous and electric vehicle technology workers to the area.

Fair, a used-vehicle leasing subscription service, has closed a $500 million revolving-credit deal with Mizuho Bank.

The companies announced the deal Tuesday. The arrangement is expected to help Fair grow a fledgling partnership with Uber that helps drivers — regardless of their credit — access vehicles that come ready for ride-hailing operations.

The partnership with Mizuho Bank, one of Japan’s largest financial services companies, marks the latest for Fair, a 3-year-old startup founded by former TrueCar CEO Scott Painter.

It’s the third line of credit that Fair has closed in recent months, following a $100 million debt facility and minor equity investment from Ally Financial in August and a $50 million increase to an existing credit line with Silicon Valley Bank in July.

SoftBank Group Corp. is among several credit providers partnering with Mizuho in the latest financing arrangement. The transaction, Fair says, should increase the supply of potential ride-hailing vehicles for prospective Uber drivers who may not qualify for traditional loans or leases.

“Too often, people who want to drive for Uber can’t get reasonable rates on a car loan or even get access to one at all, so we’re taking care of that for them,” Painter said in a written statement.

Fair works with car dealerships to provide used and certified used vehicles. Customers can return their vehicles whenever they want, with five days’ notice. Fair touts the possibility dealers can foster relationships with these customers.

For Uber drivers, each vehicle’s weekly payment includes unlimited miles, insurance, maintenance and roadside assistance. Payments vary depending on the vehicle selected.

Fair’s subscriptions help bridge a gap for customers who don’t want to lock into long-term car loans or leases. Those customers often are ride-hailing and other gig-economy drivers.

“Not only do subscriptions make sense for ride-sharing drivers who want to access a vehicle on their own terms, but they essentially replace a system built on auto debt with a recurring-revenue model and steady cash flow,” said Andrew Karnovsky, managing director and head of automotive banking at Mizuho Americas. “We believe Fair is an appealing partner for institutional lenders looking to manage the consumer credit risk associated with traditional auto finance.”

STOCKHOLM — Swedish auto-technology supplier Veoneer said on Tuesday it had won a production contract with an unidentified “world-leading” automaker to manufacture a thermal camera for an autonomous vehicle.

Veoneer’s products include radars, vision systems, and advanced driver assistance and autonomous driving software that are widely expected to play an integral part in the next generations of cars over the coming decades.

“This award is an industry breakthrough for Veoneer,” CEO Jan Carlson said in a statement.

“Thermal cameras are critical for enhancing the safety of autonomous vehicles because of their unique sensing capabilities.”

Veoneer has seen its shares plunge over the past year due to weak auto markets and automakers’ plans for self-driving cars being pushed further into the future due to regulatory and technological challenges as well as mounting costs.

Veoneer said the production start was planned for 2021, and a company spokesman Thomas Jonsson told Reuters that while the production volumes were expected to be low, the contract was of high technical significance.

“It’s the first time, as far as we know, that a carmaker has made the decision to include thermal cameras as a sensor on self-driving cars,” he said.

FRANKFURT — Ford Motor Co. could build more than one electric vehicle based on Volkswagen Group’s EV platform, Ford of Europe President, Stuart Rowley, told a German business paper.

To make only one model made no sense financially, and a decision about whether to build a second model could happen soon, Rowley is quoted telling Handelsblatt.

“Yes, we are in talks about this,” Rowley told the paper.

Ford said in July that it will use VW’s modular electric toolkit, known as MEB, to design a new battery-electric vehicle for its European operations. The automaker said it expects to deliver more than 600,000 MEB-based vehicles in Europe over a six-year period starting in 2023.

VW has invested $7 billion in its MEB architecture since 2016. It plans to use MEB to underpin about 15 million cars for its VW, Audi, Skoda and Seat brands including hatchbacks, sedans, crossovers and minivans in the next decade.

Self-driving truck company TuSimple continues to add to its coffers.

The company announced Tuesday it has raised an additional $120 million, part of an extended funding round that includes an investment from the venture arm of global logistics giant UPS Inc.

New participants in the latest funding include CDH Investments, Lavender Hill Capital and auto supplier Mando Corp. The latest round was led by Sina, the Chinese tech company behind the Weibo social-media platform. Founded in 2015, TuSimple has raised $298 million to date.

Company officials say the new funds will allow them to continue developing their technology and expand routes –- on which trucks are hauling freight while testing with human safety drivers behind the wheel.

TuSimple has emerged as one of the early self-driving front-runners in the chase for a slice of a trucking industry worth more than $800 billion to the U.S. economy each year. At a time when the American Trucking Associations says the industry faces a shortage of more than 50,000 drivers, automated trucks could someday help alleviate that shortfall.

“There is no consumer-acceptance barrier to overcome, only a business-benefit barrier,” says Mike Ramsey, senior research director at consulting firm Gartner. “Even so, I think that autonomy in trucking will be in highly specific regions and roadways, expanding slowly as the technology improves.”

TuSimple has been building out its business plans. The company has been hauling packages daily for UPS between Phoenix and Tucson, Ariz. This year, it conducted a pilot project with the U.S. Postal Service, driving interstate routes between Dallas and Phoenix.

A spokeswoman for TuSimple says the company has 35 trucks, with plans to expand to 50 in the near term. “We’re adding the new trucks to the fleet as fast as we can get them,” the spokeswoman said.

Other investors include artificial-intelligence and computing company Nvidia, Composite Capital Management and ZP Capital.

“TuSimple continues to impress the automotive and investor community with its progress toward creating the world’s first commercial self-driving truck solution,” said Jae Chung, CFO of Mando, in a written statement. “TuSimple’s technology is at a pivotal point for maturity and it has huge market potential.”

DETROIT — A new family of electric vehicles, an all-electric pickup truck and an advanced battery system could draw much of the $7 billion that General Motors has pledged to invest in the United States as parts of contract talks with the UAW.

The automaker and the union were continuing talks late on Monday to resolve a strike by 48,000 hourly workers that shut down the company’s highly profitable U.S. operations.

GM said on Saturday it would make investments in eight facilities in four states, but did not specify timing, location or products other than the electric pickup and a battery cell plant.

Much of that investment is likely earmarked for the production of electric vehicles at two Michigan plants and battery cells in Ohio, sources said.

GM plans to begin building at least five new electric vehicles in the United States by 2023: two for Cadillac, one for Buick and two for Chevrolet, including a replacement for the Bolt EV. Sources said all of those vehicles are likely to be assembled at GM’s Orion Township plant north of Detroit.

GM also is expected to update plants in Michigan, Tennessee and Missouri to build redesigned versions of its midsize pickups and crossovers, according to a GM source. The company said it will invest in “additional new vehicle and propulsion programs,” but said nothing about opening new plants.

“With as much excess capacity as GM still has, the company won’t be opening any new plants for the foreseeable future,” said AutoForecast Solutions Vice President Sam Fiorani.

GM has said it plans to introduce a stable of electric vehicles by 2023, but has not provided details. Sources have said those vehicles will feature an advanced battery system and a new vehicle structure that is flexible and modular, to accommodate different vehicle types and sizes.

Over the past three years, GM has spent an average $8.45 billion a year on capital expenditures. Most of that investment was made in North America, another GM source said.

The $7 billion investment pledged to the UAW works out to less than $2 billion a year over the four-year life of the proposed contract.

Reuters last week disclosed that GM plans to introduce a full-size electric pickup in 2022, citing officials familiar with the company’s plans.

On Monday, a person familiar with GM’s offer to the UAW said the company could produce the electric truck at the Detroit-Hamtramck plant that now has no future assignment.

GM could also build an electric vehicle battery plant near its shuttered assembly plant in Lordstown, Ohio.